MS AFFECTS THE C.N.S.

{CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM}

what is ms?

MS is a chronic, unpredictable and often difficult to diagnose disease which affects the central nervous system (the brain, optic nerves, and spinal cord).

It is believed to be an autoimmune disorder (a disease in which the body’s immune system attacks the person’s own tissue).

WHAT HAPPENS IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS?

The short answer- is the destruction of myelin.

Myelin is a complex substance that surrounds and insulates nerve fibers and is essential for nerves to perform their function and conduct electricity. When the myelin is damaged, nerves in the brain and spinal cord lose their ability to transmit signals. Think about a cable that should bring a clear signal to your TV but has interference due to damage or corrosion.

With MS, the immune system that normally defends against viruses and bacteria, acts atypically and actually attacks the central nervous system, damaging the myelin and creating interference in normal nerve functionality and communication to various parts of the body.

MYELIN

A complex substance that isolates and protects the nerve path. It is essential to conduct electricity so that brain signals can effectively reach their target.

DAMAGED MYELIN

In MS, the Myelin is attacked by immune cells and destroyed. When the myelin is damaged, nerves in the brain and spinal cord lose their ability to transmit signals.

AXON

Threadlike part of neuron that acts as the path where electrical impulses travel.

BRAIN NEURON

Nerve cells in the Brain that constantly send & receive signals.

CELL BODY

Also known as Soma.

DENDRITES

Part of the neuron that connects with neighboring cells and relays incoming messages to the cell body.

SYNAPSES

Gap between 2 nerves where information is passed along.

RISK FACTORS

Despite being discovered in 1868, there is still much mystery surrounding the causes of the disease. We do know there are several factors that may increase your risk for developing Multiple Sclerosis, including:

AGE:

Commonly affects people who are between 20-40 years of age

GENDER:

Women are twice as likely as men to develop MS.

FAMILY HISTORY:

If one of your parents or a sibling has MS, you have a 1-3% chance of developing the disease

ETHNICITY:

Caucasian people, particularly those whose families originated in Northern Europe are at the highest risk of developing MS.

For more Information please visit The Multiple Sclerosis Center of Atlanta.

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